Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Easter fell on April Fools Day this year, and one of my musical colleagues handed out bulletins to the choir that had Christmas carols listed for the hymns. I’m guessing that chaos and consternation ensued! There were surely plenty of unfortunate jokes told as part of sermons all over the world as well, and so it doesn’t feel quite as unseemly as it might to suggest that we were celebrating Jesus thumbing his nose at death on Easter.

Thumbing his nose? Where on earth did that kooky expression originate? […]

from Sonya Sutton’s blog Notes for a New Day  Click to read the full post.

Read Full Post »

 

[…]When I pay attention to the big picture I am constantly outraged, and I have to admit that is as depressing and wearying as it is overwhelming. The words of Good Friday’s O vos omnes remind me, however, to pay attention to those right around me. Those that I might otherwise walk by[…]

Read more at: Attendite — Notes for a New Day

Read Full Post »

PROCESSIONS

Adapted from something I wrote four years ago:

 

 

 

 

 

It wasn’t just an impromptu, spontaneous procession that Sunday outside of Jerusalem in the year 30 where the supporters and fans of Jesus seated him on a donkey, cried “Hosanna,” and spread palm branches in his path as children cheered.

No, Jesus had planned it in advance, using the Jewish book of Jeremiah as his guide. Here it says that a king would be coming to Jerusalem “humble and riding on a colt, the foal of a donkey.” It was to be a peaceful, procession, since Jeremiah also says that the king riding on a donkey will banish war from the land – no more chariots, war-horses, or bows.

Even more surprising is that there was a second procession that same day, at the same time, far different from that of the peaceful procession of Jesus and his enthuiastic supporters. Marcus Borg and John Dominic Crossan tell us: “On the opposite side of the city, from the west, Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor of Ideuma, Judea, and Samaria, entered Jerusalem at the head of a column of imperial cavalry and soldiers. It was the custom of the Roman governors of Judea to be in Jerusalem for the major Jewish festival such as Passover, in case there was trouble.

They go on: “Imagine the imperial procession’s arrival in the city: A visual barrage of imperial power; cavalry on horses, foot soldiers, leather armor, helmets, weapons, banners, golden eagles mounted on poles, sun gleaming on metal and gold… The sounds of the marching of feet, the creaking of leather, the clinking of bridles, the beating of drums. The swirling of dust. Pilate’s procession was not only about Roman power but also Roman theology, wherein the emperor was not simply the ruler of Rome, but the Son of God.”

So Jesus entered the city from the east, on a donkey, Pilate from the west, in a golden chariot. One was a peasant procession, the other an imperial procession, brandishing all of the might and power of the Roman Empire. The confrontation between these two powers continues through the last week of Jesus’ life. Holy Week is the story of this confrontation.

We, too, are conflicted, torn. The pull of the world and its obligations, along with the power of structures that hold us fast – commitments we must keep, appointments we cannot break, obligations we must honor — challenges the invitation to walk through this week with Jesus, step by step. The confrontation of powers, of authority, of loyalties, plays out in the hearts and lives of us all.

This Sunday we will carry our palms and process from the the undercroft, upstairs and outside and down Kent Street to mighty Summit Avenue, and then back to church, identifying ourselves to everyone who sees us as followers of Jesus. And then back to church where we will hear the full story…

See you there.
Barbara

Read Full Post »

The Poet Thinks About the Donkey

by Mary Oliver

On the outskirts of Jerusalem
the donkey waited.
Not especially brave, or filled with understanding,
he stood and waited.

How horses, turned out into the meadow,
leap with delight!
How doves, released from their cages,
clatter away, splashed with sunlight.

But the donkey, tied to a tree as usual, waited.
Then he let himself be led away.
Then he let the stranger mount.

Never had he seen such crowds!
And I wonder if he at all imagined what was to happen.
Still, he was what he had always been: small, dark, obedient.

I hope, finally, he felt brave.
I hope, finally, he loved the man who rode so lightly upon him,
as he lifted one dusty hoof and stepped, as he had to, forward.

Read Full Post »

Many describe the Welsh poet and priest R.S. Thomas as a “poet of the cross,” and his poems often include the stark image of an empty cross – or an “untenanted” one, in his words. His untenanted cross no longer bears death, however, but witnesses life. There is nothing kind or warm about a cross. […]

via Poets of the Cross — Notes for a New Day

Read Full Post »

One of my favorite hymns to teach young choristers in years past has been Hymn 140 in The Hymnal 1982, and I urge you to take a few minutes to listen to this gorgeous recording. With its plaintive 17th century tune and text by John Donne it was seemingly far beyond their years, and yet somehow […]

via Undone by Donne — Notes for a New Day

Read Full Post »

From “Notes for a New Day,” by Interim Music Director Sonya Sutton.

On the Episcopal Church’s liturgical calendar, February 27 is the day which commemorates George Herbert, 17th century Anglican priest and metaphysical poet. Ambiguity, some would argue, is at the heart of Anglicanism, and it is also the essence of George Herbert’s poetry. Writing in 1928, T.S. Eliot, suggested that Herbert (1593-1633) appeared on the scene at […]

via Such a Feast — Notes for a New Day

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »